5 Benefits of Interactive Learning for Economics

‘Bivariate Sample Plot,’ example of interactive content from Summatic’s Intermediate Econometrics course offering.
‘Nash Equilibrium,’ from Summatic’s Intermediate Microeconomics content, helps students to grasp components of game theory step-by-step.

‘Robinson Crusoe Competitive Equilibrium,’ from Summatic’s Intermediate Microeconomics content, allows students to engage and visualise various embedded components at play at once.

  1. Geerling, Wayne (2012). Bringing the ‘Dismal Science’ to Life: Teaching Economics Through Multimedia, International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, Vol. 11(2), pages 81-90. ↩︎
  2. ↩︎
  3. Fisher, J. S., & Radvansky, G. A. (2018). Patterns of forgetting. Journal of Memory and Language, 102, 130–141. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jml.2018.05.008. ↩︎
  4. Yun, Y., Allen, P., Chaumpanich, K., & Xaio, Y. (2014). Interactive Learning to Stimulate the Brain’s Visual Center and to Enhance Memory Retention, US Department of Education: International Conference e-Learning 2014, https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED557287.pdf. ↩︎
  5. Cider, J. (2024). The Importance of Interactive Learning in School, QA Education Magazine, https://qaeducation.co.uk/article/importance-interactive-learning-school/#:~:text=Interactive%20learning%20is%20a%20prime,people)%20than%20they%20do%20reading. ↩︎
  6. Ibid.
    Cowen, P.S. (1984) “Film and Text: Order Effects in Recall and Social Inferences”, Educational Communication and Technology, volume 32, pp. 131–44. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02768830
    Willingham, Daniel T. (2009) Why Don’t Students Like School? San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. ISBN: 9780470279304
    ↩︎
  7. Geerling, W. (2011). Teaching Economics through Multimedia, The Economics Network, https://doi.org/10.53593/n1298a. ↩︎
  8. Dixit, A. (2005). Restoring Fun to Game Theory, Journal of Economic Education, Vol. 36, No. 3, Summer, pp. 205-219, https://doi.org/10.3200/JECE.36.3.205-219. ↩︎
  9. Moosavian, S. (2016). Teaching Economics and Providing Visual “Big Pictures” – Case of General Equilibrium in the IS/LM/AS/AD Framework in Intermediate Macroeconomics, the 14th Annual Cambridge Business & Economics Conference, https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1601/1601.01771.pdf. ↩︎
  10. Nilson, L.B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, print. ↩︎
  11. Ibid. ↩︎
  12. Moosavian, S. (2016). Teaching Economics and Providing Visual “Big Pictures” – Case of General Equilibrium in the IS/LM/AS/AD Framework in Intermediate Macroeconomics, the 14th Annual Cambridge Business & Economics Conference, https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1601/1601.01771.pdf ↩︎
  13. Hancock, T., Smith, S., Timpte, C. & Wunder, J. (2010). PALs: Fostering Student Engagement and Interactive Learning, Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, Vol. 14, No. 4, pg. 37 – 56. ↩︎
  14. Joshua Miller, Robert Rebelein 2011 Edward Elgar The International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics in "The International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics," Gail Hoyt and KimMarie McGoldrick, Eds. ↩︎
  15. University of Lincoln (2024). Adding Interactivity: Going Further, Digital Education, https://digitaleducation.lincoln.ac.uk/online-teaching-learning/encouraging-students-in-online-classrooms/gaining-sustaining-engagement/adding-interactivity-going-further/. ↩︎
  16. Kohler, K. (2024). Teaching Macroeconomics with an Open-Source Online Model Simulation in R and Python, The Economics Network, https://doi.org/10.53593/n3917a. ↩︎
  17. Geerling, Wayne (2012). Bringing the ‘Dismal Science’ to Life: Teaching Economics Through Multimedia, International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, Vol. 11(2), pages 81-90.  ↩︎
  18. Joshua Miller, Robert Rebelein 2011 Edward Elgar The International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics in "The International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics," Gail Hoyt and KimMarie McGoldrick, Eds. ↩︎
  19. Ibid. ↩︎

Receive More Insight From Us

Summatic

Summatic is an interactive platform for university STEM courses and school maths (A-level, IB, (I)GCSE), designed and developed by Cambridge academics. Our mission is to deliver exceptional learning and online assessment.

Follow Us

Recent Posts